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“Healing the planet through agriculture”

Hawthorne Valley Farm • Ghent, New York

Biodynamic Farm

Hawthorne Valley Farm • Ghent, New York
Grgich Hills Estate • Rutherford, CA

Biodynamic Farm

Grgich Hills Estate • Rutherford, CA
Hoskins Berry Farm • Kings Valley, OR

Biodynamic Farm

Hoskins Berry Farm • Kings Valley, OR
Avena Botanicals • Rockport, ME

Biodynamic Farm

Avena Botanicals • Rockport, ME
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Biodynamic Farm

Front Porch Farm • Healdsburg, CA

Biodynamic Practices

In day-to-day practice the goal is to create a farm system that is minimally dependant on imported materials, and instead meets its needs from the living dynamics of the farm itself.  It is the biodiversity of the farm, organized so that the waste of one part of the farm becomes the energy for another, that results in an increase in the farm’s capacity for self-renewal and ultimately makes the farm sustainable.

This requires that, as much as possible, a farm be regenerative rather than degenerative.  Consider carefully materials that are imported onto the modern day organic farm.  Where do they come from?  Often they can be tracked back to a natural resource provided by the earth. Examples include petroleum to move materials around, ancient mineral deposits, by-products of unsustainable agriculture-related industry, and the life of the seas and waterways.  An important social value of Biodynamic farming is that it does not depend on the mining of the earth’s natural resource base but instead emphasizes contributing to it.

“To me, organic was just substituting clean materials for chemicals. But it was the same mindset as conventional farming.  I felt like we were just dealing with the symptoms rather than the cause. I liked that biodynamics builds up the immune system. It’s working on overall health rather than just treating symptoms.”
- Rudy Marchesi, Farmer and Winemaker, Montinore Estate  Forest Grove, OR