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“Healing the planet through agriculture”

Hawthorne Valley Farm • Ghent, New York

Biodynamic Farm

Hawthorne Valley Farm • Ghent, New York
Grgich Hills Estate • Rutherford, CA

Biodynamic Farm

Grgich Hills Estate • Rutherford, CA
Hoskins Berry Farm • Kings Valley, OR

Biodynamic Farm

Hoskins Berry Farm • Kings Valley, OR
Avena Botanicals • Rockport, ME

Biodynamic Farm

Avena Botanicals • Rockport, ME
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Biodynamic Farm

Front Porch Farm • Healdsburg, CA

Environmental Message

Agricultural land occupies 50 percent of the earth’s habitable surface, about 41 percent of U.S. land. In the U.S. food production contributes 18 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions.  Concerns of climate change cannot be successfully addressed without addressing agriculture’s contribution to it but, conversely, agriculture can be a potent solution.

Because the underlying theme of the Farm Standard is to generate inputs out of the life of the farm system itself rather than importing them from outside, the heart of a Biodynamic farm’s fertility system is the sequestering and recycling of carbon.  Crop rotation and integration of animal agriculture also assist in reducing petrochemical inputs compared to conventional agricultural practices.  These factors, in addition to Biodynamic farming’s focus on improving soil health, water quality and biodiversity, combine to make it one of the highest paradigms of sustainable agriculture. Demeter’s vision is to heal the planet through agriculture.

“With the right type of agriculture, emissions leading to climate change can be minimized and the capacity of nature to mitigate climate change can be harnessed to sequestrate significant quantities of atmospheric carbon dioxide – especially in the soil. The Farming Systems Trial, an ongoing thirty-year study at the Rodale Institute demonstrates the potential… to sequester an equivalent of up to 30% of all annual world greenhouse gas emissions… with cover crops, crop rotation, and biological nutrition sources.”
- IFOAM “The Contribution of Organic Agriculture to Climate Change Mitigation” 2009